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Contemporary Art Awards 2018

Finalist Exhibition

Exhibition:11 January - 11 June 2018

 

Congratulations to the 2018 Winners 

First Prize: Kym Frame (QLD)

 

Highly Commended: Carmel Louise (VIC), Amandeep Kaur (ACT), Rhys Knight (VIC)

 

Adam Pearson

New South Wales, Australia

This self-portrait is essentially a multi-layered and multi-faceted exploration of balance. I have explored the concept of balance through colour, shape, dark & light and also the aspect of balance within myself. Having had a long and tumultuous relationship with a variety of forms of self-expression, I have stumbled across a style of creating that I feel embodies my wish to create something beautiful, unconventional and controversial in its aesthetic. This work combines my love of folk-art & decorative elements, with the desire to explore spiritual aspects of myself, concepts of idealism and juxtaposition. Self Portrait in Winter (2017) is a pivotal or climactic piece in a series of abstract and surreal pen drawings.

Self Portrait in Winter

Mixed media on canvas

91 x 122cm

2017

Adam Pearson | Self Portrait on Winter | 91 x 122cm | mixed media on canvas | 2017
 
 
Al Roberts | David | Bronze | 61 x 19 x 26cm | 2017

Al Roberts

Tasmania, Australia

Every day, when I put my work shirt on I quickly contort my body into peculiar positions, so I do not have to undo any of the time-consuming buttons. I save approximately forty seconds per day putting on and taking off my shirt this way. Over the average working person’s life, it can save forty seconds per day, three minutes and thirty-three seconds per week, 2.66 hours a year, which equates to five full days over a 45-year working career. That’s a lot of time you can save from merely not wasting your time with buttons.

David

Bronze

61 x 19 x 26cm

2017

Al Roberts | David | Bronze | 61 x 19 x 26cm | 2017
 

Gripping for Life

Archival inkjet print

70 x 46cm

2017

Alberto Monte Rego | Gripping for Life | Achival injet print | 70 x 46cm | 2017

Alberto Monte Rego

Queensland, Australia

Like a lot of my work, this piece began with an intended play with simple photographic techniques to bring movement and life to the subject. Secondary, through the editing process, a phase of revelation begins, when appreciable lines, shapes and colours combine to create a narrative. "Gripping for Life" reflects those elements and appearing forms, a dark, deep, perhaps damaged picture of our depressed forests. But, it also reveals a strong, resilient and alive state. Focusing on aesthetic values, the image is intended to stimulate our visual senses and encourage reflection on our relationships with nature.

In the Process of Healing (2017) is an immersive installation of photography, sound and space which attempts to remove the stigma around trauma and normalise conversations that are difficult. In the Process of Healing (2017) tells a story of hope and survival. Responding to the stories of institutional abuse and growing rates of suicide, I have worked with a local refugee family to create a moving and respectful collection that reflects the process of healing. My vision is to give hope. To document the invisible lives, drowned by society's attempts to maintain normalcy through keeping their eyes shut, pretending that lives don't exist, referring to them as numbers. These are important conversations to have in our community, and this installation provides a contemplative and physical space for conversations about trauma and moving forward in life. "
The room with the 'Chair of Nails' is terrifyingly effective and heightens a physical sense of traumatic experience within the body and the mind. The floating images on fabric depict a family of refugees with their faces hidden, conveying a sense of fear, hope and the journey towards healing.

 

Aldona Kmiec | Invisible Lives | Installation view | 2017

Aldona Kmiec

Victoria, Australia

Aldona Kmiec | Invisible Lives | 120 x 300cm | Photographic on fabric | 2017
Aldona Kmiec | Invisible Lives - Chair of Nails | 300 x 120cm | Photographic on fabric | 2017

Invisible Lives (From the Process of Healing Series)

Installation View

2017

Invisible Lives

Photograph on fabric

120 x 300cm

2017

Invisible Lives - Chair of Nails

Antique chair, old barb wire and nails

Variable

2017

 
Alejandra Sieder | Shaping thoughts into physical manifestations | 150 x 120cm | 2017

Alejandra Sieder

New South Wales, Australia

I am here in front of you. My soul is a fire, brilliant and powerful as yours. I control my thoughts, and I convert them into real evidence that is created from my mind. I have the potential to create everything I want, like you, in harmony with the Universe... All my thoughts are like seeds, they have life itself, and through my magical hands, they become realities when the environment is perfect to materialise them. I have my own power as you have yours. We are together through the path on this same Earth. I invite you to go on a journey inside your mind, your soul, and your skin and then find your own extraordinary gift. Have you realised all the power you have in your cells?

Shaping thoughts into physical manifestations

Acrylic, oil and ink on canvas

150 x 120cm

2017

 
 
Amalea Manifis | Anamnesis | Oil on board | 90 x 90cm | 2016

Amalea Manifis

New South Wales, Australia

Anamnesis in classical philosophy is the act of significant remembering; it does not simply refer to the past, but its resonance within the present. Anamnesis and its antithesis (historical amnesia) are central to the work of Amalea Manifis. Her work is an active reconstruction of the past from the fragmentary remains of an original trace. Amalea focuses on her own ancestor’s history, particularly the genocide in Smyrna in 1922. Without the individual and collective memory, narratives between generations can be silenced, barred from entering the field of history.

Anamnesis

Oil on board

90 x 90cm

2016 

 
Amandeep Kaur | Liminal Mindscapes | Digital print | 118.9 x 84.1cm | 2017

Amandeep Kaur

Australian Capital Territory, Australia

Amandeep Kaur experiments with digitally created photomontages that have layers of deliberately fabricated liminal spaces in which the idea of the self is explored. Amandeep creates the works using digital photographs of various local and foreign spatial environments that she has visited in the recent past. Her work is often women-centric and questions the displacement, dislocation and also the connections and negotiations of women through the journey of transmigration. Her current works are titled ‘Liminal Mindscapes’ as they explore possibilities of belonging to multiple places and the merging of local and global environments through multiple auto-ethnographic narratives.

Liminal Mindscapes (Aussies Clouds in Tokyo)

Digital print - limited edition of 9

118.9 x 84.1cm

2017

 
Amber Countryman | What's the Cost | Coal and mixed media | 30 x 20  x 30cm | 2017

Amber Countryman

Queensland, Australia

I realise a dirty old piece of coal, and white satin gloves don't usually have much in common, but what connects them? MONEY. This coal jewellery is meant to represent wealth and excessiveness. I wanted to inspire questions of cost...not to the wearer, but to the environment. I want to ask if the economy, jobs and personal fortunes hold more value than the environment we rely on to sustain us. I want to suggest renewable, long-term energy sources as a more viable option than this dirty old piece of coal...leave it in the ground.

What's the Cost

Coal, jewellery findings, stand, satin gloves and fabric

30 x 20 x 30cm

2017

Amber Countryman | What's the Cost | Coal and mixed media | 30 x 20  x 30cm | 2017
 
Amica Whincop | Gorecki | mixed media on canvas | 152 x 76 x 3cm | 2017

Amica Whincop

Queensland, Australia

"If I should die this very moment, I've never known completeness, like being here with you" - Lamb (Gorecki)

It is a constant effort to find balance amidst the unpredictability and chaos of life. Nature becomes the place I turn to where the chaos becomes calm, and the contradictions find balance. My art-making reflects this constant search to capture the beauty, tranquillity, and balance inspired by the rhythms and energy of the natural world. The mystery and the 
wonder that emerges within the natural world are sources of endless inspiration.

Gorecki

Ink, acrylic, enamel, aerosol on canvas

152 x 76 x 3cm

2017

 
Anastasia Parmson | Untitled (My space at May Space) | mixed media | 82  x 151 x 127cm | 2017

Anastasia Parmson

New South Wales, Australia

I want to take drawing past its conventional two-dimensional format by combining it with other mediums such as sculpture & ready-made, video & performance, social media & augmented reality. To not just seen – but experienced.

Stripping everything down to the line - that is the most basic form of every drawing. A way to simplify, to blank out heavy implications and make things more light and approachable. Ultimately, I want my work to be about drawing people together. Perhaps creating a world in drawing can strip away enough preconceived notions to allow for a new space of co-existing.

Untitled (My space at May Space)

Ready-made objects, paint, paint marker

82 x 151 x 127cm

2017

Anastasia Parmson | Untitled (My space at May Space) | mixed media | 82  x 151 x 127cm | 2017
 
Andy Mullens | Hear! Hear! | megaphones and times | 70 x 30 x 20cm | 2017

Andy Mullens

Australian Capital Territory, Australia

Hear! Hear!  (2017) is a sculpture featuring two megaphones pressed face to face. This piece was born out of my frustrations at contemporary political and social attitudes. I repeatedly found myself feeling futile despite my efforts to campaign for what I believe. Driven by an interest in the phenomenon of echo chambers and social media algorithms that only serve to reinforce one’s beliefs, this work questions these modes of communication and consumption. I also interrogate the effectiveness of trying to convince “the other side” of our own beliefs: it seems no-one wants to have their mind changed, including myself.

Hear! Hear!

megaphones and timber

70 x 30 x 20cm

2017

Andy Mullens | Hear! Hear! | megaphones and times | 70 x 30 x 20cm | 2017
 
Anna Russell- Smith | Tree of Hope | Recycled tyres | 80 x 105 x 8cm | 2017

Anna Russell-Smith

Queensland, Australia

Inspired by my love of the earth and to make use of everyday disposable materials my series of ‘Tyred Forrest’ artworks were born. The tyres used were found on the side of the road and from this an art piece transpired into something appealing. Interestingly, the steel cable inside the tyres is used to make the tree branches. 

Each year in Australia, the equivalent of 48 million tyres reach the end of their life, only 16% of these are domestically recycled. Around two-thirds of used tyres in Australia end up in landfill, are stockpiled, illegally dumped or have an unknown fate.

Tree of Hope

Recycled tyres

80 x 105 x 8cm

2017

Anna Russell- Smith | Tree of Hope | Recycled tyres | 80 x 105 x 8cm | 2017
 
Annalise Fogg | Beneath the Ocean Current | Acrylic on canvas | 125 x 65 x 10cm | 2017

Annalise Fogg

Queensland, Australia

Growing up in beautiful sunny Queensland, Moreton Island became our annual camping holiday. There is something about the clear blue waters, fresh air and abandoned beaches that relaxes me. Each trip we trek up to the lighthouse at the end of the island. The array of blue hues that spread from coast to coast is filled with an abundance of marine life. As the waves crash up onto the rocks below, the sea turtles become clear in a cloud of white foam. I get to see this view every year as I sit on the seat that overlooks the island.

This piece is a response to the movement, colour and calmness that I feel at the lighthouse. Although the waves may crash, the sounds of the water hitting the rocks from a distance are mesmerising. Combining acrylic with water and manipulating the angle of the canvas while wet, I was able to portray a calming movement that takes you from one edge to the next. The closer you look, the more you will see. Separating forms, developing cells and intricate dots create a piece that allows you to look close, close your eyes and hear the ocean.

Beneath the Ocean Current

Acrylic on canvas (solid oak frame)

125 x 65 x 10cm

2017

 
Arjang Razzazian | Universal Punk | Glass, resin, found objects | 34 x 34 x 22cm | 2017

Arjang Razzazian

Victoria, Australia

Universal Punk (2017) puts together the visual icons that once belonged to a counterculture; to bring to attention that it is now fed by consumer fashion industry and homogenised to be a part of the mainstream market. So, if the counterculture still exists, it cannot be defined by such clichés.

Universal punk is made of everyday advertisements objects: mannequin, leather necklace, ice cream cone, stilettos and headphone.

Universal Punk

Glass, resin, found objects

34 x 34 x 22cm

2017

Arjang Razzazian | Universal Punk | Glass, resin, found objects | 34 x 34 x 22cm | 2017
 
Carmel Louise | Constructional No.1, V1 in 3D | mixed media | 100 x 100cm | 2017

Carmel Louise

Victoria, Australia

This artwork consists of 8 hand cut layers mounted to create one piece. This process emulates many levels of the gentrification process occurring across Melbourne. It begins with acquisition/demolition of defunct warehouses, then construction of “contemporary apartments”. As a result, the traditional industrial flavour of the area has been transformed by a new demographic. The businesses now sell gourmet everything, to provide for the population boom which in turn drives the need for more housing. The result becomes a metaphor for both the deconstruction process/ reconstruction of our neighbourhoods into something new, contemporary and divergent from its past.

Constructional No.1, V1 in 3D

Mixed media

100 x 100cm

2017

Carmel Louise | Constructional No.1, V1 in 3D | mixed media | 100 x 100cm | 2017
 
Danea Thyssen | Beyond the Illusion of Hope and Despair | giclee print on photorag | 90 x60cm | 2017

Beyond the Illusion of Hope and Despair

Boxed frame with Giclee Print on photo rag

90 x 60cm

2017

 

Danae Thyssen

South Australia, Australia

When we let go of the illusion of hope and despair, we recognise there is only love. Challenges are just misguided reminders that we can adapt and overcome. We can survive any situation that presents itself. 

Transformation begins when we relinquish fear and open ourselves to the magic of possibilities. The time for change is here, the time for change is now. Let go of the old self, let go of all things holding oneself back. Now is the time to manifest our divine purpose and live in the power of true identity. It is time to step into thine most authentic self and awaken the soul.

Daniel Kneebone

Victoria, Australia

 
Daniel Kneebone | The Jewelled Rose I Archival digital print | 100 x 80cm | 2017

The Jewelled Rose II, takes a luxuriously illustrative look behind the curtain at the opulent and sensuous world of burlesque. This image portraying renowned burlesque performer Zelia Rose a leading Australian burlesque performer who actively contributes to the vaudeville scene in Australia and Internationally. Therefore, the aim of the work is not only to shed light on the burlesque industry but to reveal the artists who continue to cultivate this genre in Australia. Capturing a moment of evolving drama, creating a sense of wonder and intrigue, bringing the viewer to a foreign midpoint between reality and illusion and revealing the freedom of expression that is burlesque. 

The Jewelled Rose II

Archival digital print on galerie prestige gold fibre silk - edition of 10 

100 x 80cm

2017

Daniel Kneebone | Angel Peacock | Archival digital print | 100 x 74cm | 2017

Angel Peacock portrays Lola Ramone an Australian burlesque performer through narrative art. While society worships archetypical heroic male football images, there is no female equivalent — but for me, the answer is burlesque. Strongly influenced by women’s attitude and spirit, the artform comes to life through theatricality and strong visceral archetypes. Angel Peacock aims to shed light on the burlesque industry and how these performers inspire women to embrace their femininity, as well as shine a spotlight on the artists who make this unique cultural scene what it is in Australia. 

Angel Peacock

Archival digital print on galerie prestige gold fibre silk - edition of 10 

100 x 74cm

2017

 
Daniel O'Hanlon | Torn | Metal slugs | 52 x 30cm | 2017

Daniel O'Hanlon

Queensland, Australia

Torn was a vision I had for some time, by using metal slugs from a metal punching machine that is left to waste I created this sculpture with these slugs which enabled me to created this piece with all the curves and details in this piece of art work. The name Torn has come from this piece as it has an incomplete look about it is exactly what I visioned

Torn

Metal slugs from CNC punching machine 

52 x 30cm

2017

Daniel Sherington

Queensland, Australia

 
Daniel Sherington | Tranisition 4 | Ink on arches paper | 90 x 113cm | 2017

Transition 4 (2017), is a drawing that highlights the beauty that lies within the transitionary movement of Ballet: as performed by my sister. The piece captures my sister seconds before a ‘Grand Jette’. Decontextualizing her from her surroundings, and floating her on the page, she surreally exists just within that moment: the moment of the in-between; of freedom; and of the free fall. For each movement in dance to be complete, there exists a transitionary stage. These stages, which precede and follow the movement, are something that appears completely raw: moments of duality where freedom dilutes the immense amount of concentration and discipline to create what everyone is waiting for.

Transition 4

Ink on Arches paper (300gsm)

90 x 113cm

2017

There's something ironic about making an endangered animal entirely out of plastic. Blowing air in it - to pretend that it's there.

Daniel Sherington | Hippo in Plastic | Ink on arches paper | 87 x 113cm | 2017

Hippo in Plastic

Ink on Arches paper (300gsm)

87 x 113cm

2017

 
Ella Baudinet | Genesis | oil on canvas | 76 x 122cm | 2017

Ella Baudinet

Victoria, Australia

Ella Baudinet is a Melbourne based artist working primarily with oil paints. Baudinet's work focuses on the individual’s unique perceptions of abstract expressionist aesthetics. Combining elements of expressionism, abstraction and pseudo-surrealism, she explores the parallels between the conscious and subconscious mind. While we sleep, we are submerged in an environment created and perceived simultaneously by our own minds. Our brains are a virtual reality system, providing us with sensory stimuli based on our own experiences, emotions and the person’s characteristics. Our subconscious mind is highly active while awake and determines how we perceive our surroundings. As dreaming transports us from one state of mind to another, Baudinet's paintings provide a parallel platform by inviting the viewer to envision representational characteristics in the work, thus creating the individual's unique experience.

Genesis

Oil on canvas

76 x 122cm

2017

Elmari Steyn

Western Australia, Australia

 
Elmari Steyn | Eyrie | etching and aquatint on archival paper | 20 x 30cm | 2017

Eyrie: S28o37.595’/E116o25.327 (2017) is an abandoned eagles nest tree at Gullewa in Western Australia. It is part of my current printmaking project that explores the interaction that we allow ourselves with nature, through trees, especially unusual, individual and expressive trees, even misshapen trees. Every tree expresses its own unique narrative, character, size, shape and function. Whether in untouched wild places or in urban settings, trees retain their individuality, their true form and nature; their connection and relationship to an area, with its climate, wind and setting. Each work is of an individual tree, reproduced as a copper-plate line and aquatint etching.

Eyrie: S28o37.595’/E116o25.327

Etching and aquatint on archival paper

20 x 30cm

2017

Elmari Steyn | Umbra | etching and aquatint on archival paper | 15 x 30cm | 2017

Umbra: S33o38.347’/E115o01.567 (2017) is a unique tree located in a car park at Yallingup in Western Australia. It is part of my current printmaking project that explores the interaction that we allow ourselves with nature, through trees, especially unusual, individual and expressive trees, even misshapen trees. Every tree expresses its own unique narrative, character, size, shape and function. Whether in untouched wild places or in urban settings, trees retain their individuality, their true form and nature; their connection and relationship to an area, with its climate, wind and setting. Each work is of an individual tree, reproduced as a copper-plate line and aquatint etching.

Umbra: S33o38.347’/E115o01.567

Etching and aquatint on archival paper

15 x 30cm

2017

 

Eugene Rubuls

Queensland, Australia

Eugene Rubuls | Clown Fish | Oil on canvas | 60 x 75 x 1.5cm | 2017

“Nature is my religion, and the earth is my temple.”
My paintings express my infinite admiration for the diversity of 
colour, form and textures of the natural world. This is something I want to share with everyone who is ready to see it. 
My artworks are inspired by some of the most spectacular visual images of the underwater world that have not only aesthetic impact on the viewer, but can also trigger emotions and important questions. When you love something, you naturally want to protect it so I would like my art to be a window into a world not everyone has the opportunity to see. My goal is to capture and preserve unique habitats and scenes, exquisite moments and create a visual depiction of the natural world - an endangered world, which sadly may not be here in the future.

Clown Fish

Oil on Canvas

60 x 75 x 1.5cm

2017

Eugene Rubuls | Chasing Coral | Oil on canvas | 122 x 92 x 3.5cm | 2017

Chasing Coral

Oil on Canvas

122 x 92 x 3.5cm

2017

Greg Flynn

Queensland, Australia

 
Greg Flynn | Always Remembered | acrylic on canvas | 40 x 40  x 3cm | 2017

This acrylic painting is in memory of those families of the 'FV Dianne' boating tragedy. This fishing vessel sank in wild seas off the town of 1770 in October 2017. Only one survived, two bodies recovered and four bodies unaccounted. This piece combines the underpainting tinged with red representing hope and despair, but also fear, isolation, hopelessness and the tempest at the time. The limited palette and the intensity of the angles express the torment of those on board and the families left behind. 

Always Remembered

Acrylic on Canvas

40 x 40 x 3cm

2017

 
Helen Oprey | The Lived in Room | acrylic and textured paper on canvas | 102 x 102xm | 2017

Helen Oprey

New South Wales, Australia

I play with paint, colour, texture and proportion in an attempt to portray work that is beautiful, unique and intimate. My style is emotional and not constrained by the limits of realism. Each artwork is an experiment and adventure to push my learning which creates something new to me, but always, in the end, the painting has to hold together. Thus I never get bored, and it helps to keep my work fresh.

The Lived in Room

Acrylic and textured paper on Canvas

102 x 102cm

2017

Helen Oprey | Letter to my Daughter | acrylic and textured paper on canvas | 101.5 x 101.5xm | 2017

Letter to my Daughter (2017) is an emotional artwork depicting my daughter as she endures inevitable life struggles. It is what all mothers know of their daughters - that although life is sometimes hard, unkind, unfair and confusing, they are ALWAYS beautiful to their mothers. I have depicted my daughter with her big bright eyes in a sea of colour and chaos. LIFE

Letter to my Daughter

Acrylic and textured paper on Canvas

101.5 x 101.5cm

2017

Hugh Kerr

Tasmania, Australia

 
Hugh Kerr | Carnival | arcylic and ink paper | 52 x 70cm | 2017

Carnival (2017) is about behaviour under the mask of anonymity. I recently re-read Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Although allusions to indigenous people in the book often seem euro-centric and essentially racist, it remains a fascinating examination of the human condition. The boys’ donning of disguises worn and gradual descent into barbarism and to me has resonances with current trends in society and particularly social media where anonymity (or at least distance) removes normal rules of behaviour.

Carnival

Acrylic and ink on paper

52 x 70cm

2017

Hugh Kerr | Rapacity | ink on paper | 30 x 41cm | 2017

Rapacity is a stark illustration of the physical functions of human settlements. As well having an ideal for the best of human settlement, promoting general well-being, harmony, equality, vibrancy and the sharing of knowledge and culture, I feel it is important to examine them at their worst. Rapacity presents a view of a city as an almost cancerous entity, the embodiment of the insatiability of human consumption which sucks in the resources and degrades the surrounding land.

Rapacity

Ink on paper 

30 x 41cm

2017

 
Jae Hyun Kwon | Bottles | Dyed Korean handmade paper, beer bottles | 18 x 12 x 22cm | 2017

Jae Hyun Kwon

New York, United States

I see my sculptures as a residue of a series of unconscious struggles in pursuit of my cultural identity. Technically, my sculptures are American household commodities wrapped in Hanji, Korean traditional handmade paper. Through giving a Korean colour and texture to an American commodity, I investigate the issues with merging two different cultures.

Bottles

Dyed Korean handmade paper, beer bottles

18 x 12 x 22cm 

2017

 
James Gardiner | Scape 2-17 | Tooling board & beeswax | 13x30x19cm | 2017 | Photographer: Ben Guthrie

Scape 2-17

Tooling board (high-density polyurethane foam) finished with beeswax

13 x 30 x 19cm

2017

James Gardiner

New South Wales, Australia

This sculpture is part of a series that has been running since 2011. Based on the influences such as natural eroded and stratified rock formations, science fiction and my interest in cities and the way they form or agglomerate over time. The series first emerged from an investigative exploration for 3D printing artificial reefs at full scale; sculpture was used as a method to free up my thinking and to explore form and topology. 

This work is in tooling board, a high-density polyurethane foam which has similar properties to timber while having superb strength, durability and can take extraordinary levels of detail. The sculpture is part of an investigative endeavour to develop new tooling techniques with sculpture. The sculpture series also includes stone, recycled timber and lost foam castings with pewter.

 

Photographer: Ben Guthrie

James Gardiner | Scape 2-17 | Tooling board & beeswax | 13x30x19cm | 2017 | Photographer: Ben Guthrie
 
Jan Bird | Jandamarra's War | eco dye, charcoal & oil on canvas | 110 x 110 x 2cm | 2017

Jan Bird

Victoria, Australia

The painting, Jandamarra’s War (2017), was initially inspired by Paul Kelly’s song “Jandamarra/Pigeon” (on his album "The A to Z Recordings). This led to further research into the true story of Jandamarra, an Australian Aboriginal man who led a rebellion against invading pastoralists in defence of his people's ancient land and culture.

Jandamarra's War

Eco dye, charcoal and oil on canvas

110 x 110 x 2cm

2017

Jan Bird | Forgotten Heroes | eco dye, charcoal & oil on canvas | 110 x 110 x 2cm | 2017

A mere 18 years after the death of Jandamarra, where the aboriginal people were chained and shot for spearing stock, the aboriginal population had now learnt to live peacefully with the white landowners and adopted a more European lifestyle. Many aborigines proudly enlisted in WW1 despite being afforded very few rights in the country they fought for.

Forgotten Heroes

Eco dye, charcoal and oil on canvas

110 x 110 x 2cm

2017

 
Janelle Amos | History with a Tree | achival pigment print on textured paper | 64 x 64cm | 2017

Janelle Amos

South Australia, Australia

This limited edition archival pigment print captures my ephemeral nature mandala of roadside Pomegranates from my hometown. My dear childhood friend and I would spend sunny days exploring, climbing and eating from this very tree. Constructed in the elements of the moment and photographed in the natural Autumn light. 

My art practice is a contrast of ephemeral mandalas and abstract paintings. My work is intuitive, allowing the natural elements around me to guide the outcome. Engaging with nature has opened up a creative response to my everyday emotional life, and put me in touch with my honest creative expression.

History with a Tree

Archival pigment print on textured fine art paper

64  x 64cm

2017

Janelle Amos | Native Home | achival pigment print on textured paper | 64 x 64cm | 2017

This limited edition archival pigment print captures my ephemeral nature mandala of Australian Natives from my hometown, aching of my personal connection to my country through my immediate natural environment. Constructed in the elements of the moment and photographed in the natural Autumn light. 

Native Home

Archival pigment print on textured fine art paper

64  x 64cm

2017

 
Jeramie Scahill | Dreamscape | Stirling silver, goose egg, charcoal, wood | 20 x 20 x 90cm | 2017

Jeramie Scahill

New South Wales, Australia

Like a surreal dream, a mix of components come together from different times and experiences. Uniting together to form an an abstract story that stretches the imagination and begs for an explanation. Sending the viewer on a journey of self interpretation. A black goose egg bound with silver bands with silver spikes each end. A Gothic Faberge egg suspended like a plumb bob swinging from two hardwood twigs collected from the very top of an ancient tree. Two twigs are bound with silver wire and held taught from the weight of the pendulating egg. A mirror finished Stirling silver pyramid emerges from a block of charcoal like like a contemporary growth causing a juxtaposition of upward energy against the downward strain of the pendulum. The charcoal plinth made from the core of an old tree with the story's of its battles with decay and life itself evident at every angle. Hollowed out by the smallest of ants and weather and time, the whole sculpture seems to teeter on the edge of being swallowed into its depths. An uncertain balance of nature and machine swinging precariously by a near invisible force.

Dreamscape

Stirling silver, goose egg, charcoal, wood

20  x 20 x 90cm

2017

Jonathan Garcia Mainou

Toronto, Canada

Jonathan Garcia Mainou | Religion | plexi glass mount | 57.5 x 73.2cm | 2017

My main purpose is to explore the aesthetics of the everyday through abstract visual stories about the city I live in. Using the urban landscape as a canvas, I deconstruct conceptual images as a way to escape from my daily life. By using a digital camera, I detached the sense of art from the tool and leave it to the viewer to see art as the everyday and the everyday as art. I choose not to edit the photographs as a way to examine and challenge the idea of purity and our personal perspectives on beauty.

Religion

Plexi Glass Mount

57.5  x 73.2cm

2017

 
 
Jude Hotchkiss | Earthburst | oil & medium on canvas | 122 x 122 x 4cm | 2017

Jude Hotchkiss

New South Wales, Australia

These paintings articulate a dark testament to the unknown while holding the potential for a new genesis. There is a maelstrom of duelling powers, dark calamitous events that breed an uncertain future in a tumultuous world. At times an underlying planet is viewed from above, fractured cloud obscuring the geometric makings of a now disappearing civilisation. A feeling of profound change and upheaval lies in the violent forces overriding the geometries of a once structured and considered place. Terrible uncertainty prevails, the future is unclear, and the moment is yet to play out, for better or worse.

Earthburst

Oil and medium on canvas

122 xx 122 x 4cm

2017

Jude Hotchkiss | Stormforce | oil & medium on canvas | 122 x 122 x 4cm | 2017

Stormforce

Oil and medium on canvas

122 xx 122 x 4cm

2017

Julie Hollis

Queensland, Australia

 
Julie Hollis | Little Miss Worrywart | acrylic on canvas | 50 x 40 x 2cm | 2017

I wanted to be whimsical, and contemporary. I used white to make her hair sing, to move, to bounce. I imagine the viewer seeing her and smiling, be moved by her emotion but, wonder why she is frowning. I intended this image to be punchy and a little mysterious.

Little Miss Worrywart

acrylic on canvas

50 x 40 x 2cm

2017

 
Kate Bender | It Just Feels Like | oil on canvas | 76 x 84cm | 2017

Kate Bender

New South Wales, Australia

Kate Bender’s oil paintings embody the representation of light, and the perception of and the interplay between space and form. Ostensibly the works are an illusionistic depiction of imagined forms and spaces, within which exists a harmony of colour, light and shape invoking within the viewer a sensorial experience evocative of emotion, mood, and music. 
Abstraction is merged with elements of illusionism creating a simultaneous ambiguity and degree of playfulness in the immediate visual and sensorial experience. The undetermined forms float in a fictional space; at times open, ethereal and intangible; other times closed, appearing substantial and three-dimensional.

It Just Feels Like

Oil on canvas

76 x 84cm

2017

Kate Bender | Longing for Light and Light | oil on canvas | 76 x 61cm | 2017

Longing for Love and Light

Oil on canvas

76 x 61cm

2017

Katrin Terton

Queensland, Australia

 
Katrin Terton | A Seeker's Thoughts | mixed media | 44 x 96 x 7cm | 2017

I am drawn to organic materials such as beeswax, shed snake skins, feathers and hair as well as found objects. The chair and ladder in this piece are recurring metaphors in my work; representing contemplation and the wish to reach new places internally or externally, the need for stillness, the wish to escape, the desire to evolve. The seeker is open to step into new worlds and explore the liminal space in between while questioning where he or she came from and where the journey may lead…

A Seekers Thoughts

Beeswax, wire, hair, grass, feathers, shed snakeskin, timber

44  x 96 x 7cm

2017

Kay Armstrong

New South Wales, Australia

 
Kay Armstrong | Down the Plughole | ink, acrylic, digital print on paper | 21 x 29cm | 2017

Working with a limited palette, this was about mark making to create a sense of movement on the page. It's also about ageing, the inevitability of it all.

Down the Plughole

Ink, acrylic, digital print on paper

21  x 29cm

2017

Kay Armstrong | Gills of the world | ink, acrylic, cardboard on paper | 21 x 29cm | 2017

Working with a limited palette, I wanted to create something visceral, veinous and organic. I am obsessed with layers. They seem to me, a way to develop a sense of time/memory within a two-dimensional form.

Gills of the world

Ink acrylic, cardboard on paper

21 x 29cm

2017

Kym Frame

Queensland, Australia

 
Kym Frame | In the Hold | Mixed media | 60 x 130 x 130cm | 2017

In the Hold (2017) explores the human experience of holding and processing pain. An installation, the piece is comprised of a seated female form made from handmade banana fibre paper and a bundle of notes on hexagonal pieces of translucent paper. From a tear in the figure's left shoulder, light spills out, and at her feet, a panel glows. Atop this panel, a pile of the notes, some of which have fallen into tessellating patches, rest. Filled with memories and messages, these words capture the fears and burdens of 150 different women and represent the strength, vulnerability and resilience of women.

In the Hold

Handmade Banana fibre paper, methylcellulose, steel, cardboard, led light, waxed paper, human hair.

60 x 130 x 130cm

2017

Kym Frame | In the Hold | Mixed media | 60 x 130 x 130cm | 2017

Lauri Smith

New South Wales, Australia

 
Lauri Smith | Rita + her pet jude | Silicone, wire, foam, hair & wood | 60 x 55 x 45cm | 2017

This work explores my interest in the relationship between people and their pets, that friendship and love between them that is like no other. I wanted to represent the importance of animals and how we are inherently similar to them and share the same love/heart. This sculpture is a portrait style of an elderly woman and her anteater/human-like pet to represent this concept. The pet is holding a human heart as an abstract offering of the love shared.

Rita + her pet Jude

Silicone, wire, foam, hair and wood

55 x 60 x 45cm

2017

This work titled The Secret Conversation of Snow Yaks (2016) came from a vivid dream I had about three snow yak men set amongst a snowy landscape. These creatures were having a secret conversation which I (as the viewer) interrupted. I was inspired to recreate this other-worldly dreamed vision and continue to explore these ideas further.The process began with the initial concept/drawing to sculpting, mold making, casting and finishing, these creatures take on a life of their own.

Secret Conversation of Snow Yaks

Silicone, wire, and mohair

40 x 15 x 25cm (all three pieces together)

2016

 
Leah Doeland | Awakening | acrylic on canvas | 101 x 76 x 3.5cm | 2017

Leah Doeland

New South Wales, Australia

Do you hear the insects buzzing? Can you hear a bird calling? Is that a voice or just the whisper of the wind chasing its way throughout the leaves high above your head? Sweet and aromatic scents fill the air – breathe deep – Awaken your senses, Awaken your soul.

As an artist, I am continually inspired by the beauty of nature and the wonder of creation. Through my art, I explore imaginative aspects of our natural world. My work intends to captivate and calm the viewer while imparting a sense peace.

Awakening

Acrylic on canvas

101 x 76 x 3.5cm 

2017

 
Leah D Jeffries | Just a sec... | oil on canvas | 108 x 122cm | 2017

Leah D Jeffries

South Australia, Australia

Painted in a manner that refers to a simpler time, yet the subject matter highlights a contemporary phenomenon. A compelling self-portrait with Leah’s children. The eldest ten years old, along with her smartphone also in its 10th year. With all this device offers, does it take more than it gives? We are physically present, but mentally and emotionally absent, transfixed, doing anything but being present to what is important. “Just a sec…”

Just a sec...

Oil on canvas

108 x 122cm 

2017

Leah Mariani

Victoria, Australia

Leah Mariani | Doll Face | Printed cotton fabric, gesso, oil on canvas | 41 x 41cm | 2017

Doll Face (2017) is part of my latest series, I'm Just a Girl, which considers the way we view women. There is increasing social pressure for women to undergo procedures to stay looking young. Woman want clear, wrinkle-free skin, clear eyes, white teeth, perfect hair, long eyelashes, plump lips. Soon we will all look like dolls.
The pattern of the vintage dolls is achieved by adhering cotton fabric onto the canvas before painting in oils over the top. The dolls are innate, lifeless objects that have no facial expressions, much like women who have had too much Botox.

Doll Face

Printed cotton fabric, gesso, oil on canvas

41 x 41cm 

2017

 
Leah Mariani | Ready to Serve | digital print, oil, gesso and printed canvas | 41 x 41cm | 2017

Ready to Serve (2017) is part of my latest series, I'm Just a Girl, it considers the way we treat women. The painting has dual meanings. Firstly, it makes reference to how women are often described as edible objects ("yummy mummy" for example), though the use of the pieces of cake in the clothing. Secondly, woman are often expected to wait on men (mothers, secretaries, waitresses). Often in the corporate world, if there is a sole woman in a meeting or a department, it often falls on her to order coffees or tidy up after a meeting.

Ready to Serve

Digital print, oil, gesso and printed canvas

41 x 41cm 

2017

 
Leonie Scott | Buzz | acrylic polymer on hammermuhle paper | 59 x 84cm | 2017

Leonie Scott

New South Wales, Australia

While researching abstract expressionist, it occurred to me they may have been seeking kinetic, mood-shifting enjoyment while engaged in the painting action. Buzz came about when I approached this particular session to deliberately paint in a similar style to Jackson Pollock. After several sketches, I quickly moved on and began my own exploration and self-expression. Buzz has a great deal of movement reflecting the energy and quickness of my painting.Buzz is so called because of the euphoria felt as I was fully engaged. 

Buzz

Acrylic polymer on hammermuhle paper (300gsm)

59 x 84cm 

2017

Leonie Scott | Buzz | acrylic polymer on cartridge paper (140gsm)  | 59 x 84cm | 2017

Regrowth (2017) is a result of a session to mimic the rhythmic brushwork of Bryan Wynter.  I particularly admire the individuality of his work mainly his works of the 1950s.  The session encouraged me to create a pattern using large and small brushes, and be more deliberate with how and where the brush strokes were placed.

 

Regrowth is a response to a drive through the East Gippsland of Victoria. The resilience of Australian bushland after fire ceases to amaze me. The new saplings with red and orange leaves at their tips contrasted with the blackened trunks of the old growth.

Regrowth

Acrylic polymer on cartridge paper (140gsm)

59 x 84cm 

2017

 
Lilli Waters | In Dreams | archival pigment print | 60 x 73.3cm | 2017

Lilli Waters

Victoria, Australia

Plastic Fish (2017) is an invitation into a vibrant world abundant with iridescent objects, where fish dwell amongst opulent florals, an illusion of beauty & life. Depth and space evoke a sense of the mysterious and time appears to slow down. Beneath the surface, beauty reveals a darker truth, fragility, futility and the acute vulnerability of nature at the hands of humans, as we overwhelm all living things with our own disposable culture.

In Dreams (Plastic Fish Series)

Archival pigment print 

60 x 73.3cm 

2017

Lilli Waters | Our love is Plastic | archival pigment print | 155.15 x 111.21cm | 2017

Our Love is Plastic (Plastic Fish Series)

Archival pigment print 

155.15 x 111.21cm 

2017

Logan Moody

Victoria, Australia

 
Logan Moody | Barbershop | hand cut stencils, aerosol on wood | 60 x 84cm | 2016

A constant within my work is to always try and capture beauty in the daily tasks of city life. With Barbershop (2016) I've caught a moment in time that takes the viewer into the scene and asks them to create their own ideas about who these people are and the conversations being had.

Barbershop

Hand cut stencils, aerosol on wood

60 x 84cm 

2016

Logan Moody | Specials | hand cut stencils, aerosol on wood | 60 x 84cm | 2017

A constant within my work is to always try and capture beauty in the daily tasks of city life. With Specials (2017) I wanted to take people inside the daily life of the people who are often overlooked. I've tried to capture a moment where staff are engaging with each other, where the outside world is looking in on the people whose daily life is service and creating an enjoyable moment for others.

Specials

Hand cut stencils, aerosol on wood

60 x 84cm 

2017

 
Mark Bagally | Day Break Torquay | oil on board | 120 x 60cm | 2017

Mark Bagally

Victoria, Australia

My art practice predominately depicts seascapes and landscapes. There is no shortage of reference material being on the doorstep of the Great Ocean Road in Victoria. The colours in the sky and water are quite surreal at times and provide constant inspiration.

Day Break Torquay

Oil on board

120 x 60cm 

2017

Mark Bagally | Sunrise at Point Danger | oil on board | 120 x 60cm | 2017

Sunrise at Point Danger

Oil on board

120 x 60cm 

2017

 
Matthew Portch | Prada Marfa | archival print | 84 x 63cm | 2017

Prada Marfa

Achrival print

84 x 63cm (8cm border) 

2017

Matthew Portch

Victoria, Australia

From the Lost America series; examining a quiet stillness in a forgotten landscape that is, in a sense, ‘on-pause’. A detailed, melancholic and alluringly unremarkable outlook.

Situated quite literally in the middle of nowhere, Prada Marfa is a permanently installed sculpture by artists Elmgreen and Dragset. The store contained actual Prada wares, shoes and handbags, picked out and provided by Miuccia Prada herself. This work of art was intended never to be repaired, so it might slowly degrade back into the natural landscape. Just six days after its completion, the building was broken into, its contents were stolen, and the word "Dumb"
as well as the phrase "Dum Dum" were spray painted on the sides of the structure. The vandalism demonstrates the strong reaction to this the site-specific sculpture. It was quickly repaired, repainted, and restocked. The new Prada purses do not have bottoms and instead hide parts of a security system that alerts authorities if the bags are moved. While now protected by security cameras, its destination would make it difficult to defend, and its awnings are riddled with bullet holes. The Texas Department of Transportation is currently discussing the fate of the installation.

 
Mehrnoosh Ganji | Soul Star Brooch | Mixed media | 4.6 x 4.6cm | 2017

Soul Star Brooch

Sterling silver, fine silver, garnet, pliqur-a-jour enamel, stainless steel pins

4.6 x 4.6cm  

2017

Mehrnoosh Ganji

Victoria, Australia

The Sole Star brooch (2017) is inspired by the tessellated and elaborately detailed ceilings and multi-coloured windows of Persian architecture. It contains four layers of geometric motives, some decorated with green and blue Plique-à-jour enamel and a red garnet is sitting in the heart of the piece. Also, the Sole Star is one of the energy pathways of the human body and relates to infinite compassion and divine love that will radiate from the wearer's heart.

Mehrnoosh Ganji | Soul Star Brooch | Mixed media | 4.6 x 4.6cm | 2017
 
Michael Burgess | Malaki Wrasse | malachite, shell, fluorite | 5.5 x 4.5cm | 2017

Michael Burgess

New South Wales, Australia

As a gemstone carver, I like working a gem that reveals pattern and colour as I carve. The malachite flows with the lines of my little fish design, the mother of pearl shell make the eye pop and the purple fluorite ads colour and contrast, it all comes together to create a beautiful, eye-catching carving.

Malaki Wrasse

Malachite, shell, fluorite

5.5 x 4.5cm  

2017

Michael Burgess | Malaki Wrasse | malachite, shell, fluorite | 5.5 x 4.5cm | 2017

Michael Dyson

South Australia, Australia

Michael Dyson | Suburban Evening | acrylic on wooden panel | 50 x 60cm | 2017

An attempt at depicting a restless suburban evening by juxtaposing bright and imaginative imagery with 1950's fibro housing.

Suburban Evening

Acrylic on wooden panel

50 x 60cm  

2017

 
 
Miho Watanabe | Awareness of Between-ness... | Phototransfer on silk, LED, perspex | 76 x96cm | 2017

Miho Watanabe

New South Wales, Australia

Creating artworks is always ‘awareness of between-ness’ for me, which is reciprocal energy I believe flows in between the subject and myself. An ongoing project, Street Tree has gradually developed to see the street trees like bonsai. The background and atmosphere started to fade in my brain, and the street trees became centre stage in its world similar to bonsai’s small world, which leads to explore the aesthetic and relationship in between bonsai and street trees. And it will tap into awareness of nature in a city.

Awareness of Between-ness: Street Tree like Bonsai 1

Photo transfer on silk, LED, perspex (with frame)

76 x 96cm  

2017

Miho Watanabe | Awareness of Between-ness... | Phototransfer on silk, LED, perspex | 76 x96cm | 2017

Awareness of Between-ness: Street Tree like Bonsai 2

Photo transfer on silk, LED, perspex (with frame)

76 x 96cm  

2017

 
Noriko Sugita | Cleaning Sparrow | oil on board | 25.4 x 25.4cm | 2017

Noriko Sugita

New South Wales, Australia

This painting was inspired by a guy I use to work with. His nickname was sparrow and he was always cleaning at work. I put a cola can and a twenty dollar note amongst the fallen leaves as I wanted to make them somewhat camouflaged. The underlying concept is that in a sparrows' world all of those items are just the same to them.

Cleaning Sparrow

Oil on board

25.4 x 25.4cm  

2017

Noriko Sugita | Peachfrog | oil on board | 25.4 x 30.48cm | 2017

I love to make stories of strange scenes that don't exist. I wanted to find the best balance between peaches and frogs and paint in a style reminiscent of old Japanese paintings. I wanted to express this idea like a still life painting while keeping the background simple, the full moon is to make the scene appear like a surreal dreamscape.

Peachfrog

Oil on board

25.4 x 30.48cm  

2017

 

Bloodline

HD Video & Stereo Sound

1:15

2017

Peter & Molly

Western Australia, Australia

The video portrait responds to the recent backlash faced by activist, model and a trans woman of colour, Munroe Bergdorf when publicly articulating the privilege of white people. In response, a white, gender non-conforming artist expresses the anxieties of coming to terms with a colonial bloodline. The cognitive disconnect exhibited by white people when people of colour articulate their experiences is fuelled by white defensiveness and is an expression of the discomfort of having emerged from a history of evil. We have a responsibility to acknowledge our white privilege and the racist systems from which we automatically benefit, towards dismantling them. 

 
Rhys Knight | Self (body-world) 3 | Oil on canvas | 90 x 80cm | 2017

Rhys Knight

Victoria, Australia

Based upon Descartes' theory of dualism throughout the 17th century, Self (body-world) 3 (2017) is a modern exploration of the dichotomy between mind and body (spirit and matter) and the subsequent alienation one experiences through this duality. Appropriating Laing's (1959) existential study on Schizophrenia, the metaphysical proclamation of both religious and mechanistic philosophy relates to the distinction between mind and matter (the embodied and the unembodied) and has subsequently operated as the methodology for this work.

Self (body-world) 3

Oil on canvas

90 x 80cm

2017

Robin Wagenvoort

Zutphen, The Netherlands

Robin Wagenvoort | Agartha Face | Digital print on canvas | 50 x 60cm | 2017

Agartha Face

Digital print on canvas

50 x 60cm

2017

As a digital face art artist, I received the High Honor Cavaliere Knight Of Art of the Costanza Art Foundation in Italy. I agree that dying in honour does not distinguish between gender, race and social class, following the ancient principles that the noble knights pursued to protect the weak in society and serve for the service of humanity. Art brings people together on the basis of culture and peace.

 

Rochelle Alahendra

Queensland,  Australia

Rochelle Alahendra | Longing | oil on canvas | 30 x 30cm | 2017
Rochelle Alahendra | Longing | oil on canvas | 30 x 30cm | 2017

Up close, this piece appears to be distorted. However when the viewer steps back this portrait comes into clear focus. This motion is how I want people to treat mental health, to step back from the confused distortion and observe the person’s untold story. 
The painting “Longing” reflects the internal struggle of being restricted to speak out about mental health problems, thus leading to the life of secrecy and longing.

Longing

Oil on canvas

30 x 30cm

2017

 
 
Rodney Greenstreet | Lost World | acrylic on aluminium | 90 x 60cm | 2017

Rodney Greenstreet

Queensland,  Australia

This piece was developed by grinding the surface with a disk to generate patterns that influence subsequent layers of colour. Airbrushing acrylic is then used to fill in the larger areas and finished off with coloured pencil as texture has been built up allowing other mediums to take to the board. A final coat of satin clear seals and protects the piece. The mood of the painting changes in a different light depending on where the painting is viewed. 

Lost World

Acrylic on aluminium

90 x 60cm

2017

 
Roger Callen | Nowhere to go | watercolour & gouache on arches paper | 52.5 x 41cm | 2017

Roger Callen

Queensland,  Australia

An abandoned wood oven was photographed during the Ngarrindjeri women's protest walk (1997) from Adelaide to Kumerangk (Hindmarsh Island) against the building of the bridge to the island. While painting this work during 2017, I had the plight of refugees escaping Mosul in Syria in the back of my mind and added the damaged insects emerging from the front of the oven and entering the back. There was a resonance between the lines of refugees and the line of protesters on my walk and between the fate of the refugees, the oven and the plight of Jews under fascism during WW2. The indifferent gaze of ISIS and the coalition forces passes through damaged opera glasses. Broken snail shells represent the slowness of the exodus and the many wounded. Ultimately the bridge was built, and the fight for democracy in Syria failed - or did it? There is a tree regrowing in the background.

Nowhere to go

Watercolour and gouache on Arches paper (300 gsm)

52.5 x 41cm

2017

 

Rosie Lloyd-Giblett

Queensland,  Australia

Rosie Lloyd-Giblett | Riverbed west past Fowlers Gap | acrylic on canvas | 200 x 90cm | 2017

Being present in natural spaces grounds my being. Observation and collection of materials have always been part of my life; my mind's eye works overtime absorbing not just the visual memory but tactile and fragrant spaces. I want the viewer to enter my landscapes; experience the forest, the blossoms and the essence of being present.Over recent years my concerns for the environment have become the forefront of my art practice. Walking through natural corridors provides me with both internal and external space and stimulus. I have recently travelled to Fowlers Gap NSW and Bimblebox Nature Reserve QLD on Artist Camps. These camps allowed me to work plen air; I had to work quickly with energy and freedom. Large canvases and paper blowing in the wind give oxygen and space to my work. 

 

 

 

Riverbed west past Fowlers Gap

Acrylic on canvas

200 x 90cm

2017

 
Ruby Purple | Connections 29 | Oil on canvas | 90 x 90cm | 2017

Ruby Purple

Queensland,  Australia

Connections 29  (2017) is Ruby’s modern interpretation and abstraction inspired by ‘The Preservation of our Environment.’ This piece sits between the parallels of power and glamour with attitude and excess being key themes. By showcasing her approach to creating and refining unique manipulations Ruby aims to project the need to protect ourselves, our humanity, our planet, and to enable change of our behaviours. ‘Preservation of our Environment’ hinges on humanity balancing the scales.

Connections 29

Oil on canvas

90 x 90cm

2017

 
Sally O'Callaghan | Sydney Central | acrylic on plywood | 180 x 180cm  | 2016

Sally O'Callaghan

Australia Capital Territory,  Australia

Referencing contemporary technology in painting, Sally O’Callaghan creates large cityscape works that investigate the spaces we live in. An exploration of our urban non-places Sally’s works finds its origins in her iPhone footage taken during walks through public spaces. The illusory space created with the use of scale, fragmented perspective and repetition of imagery re-invents the spatial boundaries captured. The result invites the viewer to find commonality between the existence of the figure in the narrative of the reimagined space and there place in there own public spaces.

Sydney Central

Acrylic on plywood

180 x 180cm

2016

 
Samir Hamaiel | Red Room | acrylic on canvas | 51 x 51cm | 2017

Samir Hamaiel

Queensland,  Australia

Red Room (2017) explores many of my preoccupations – the two-point vanishing point, textured urban grain, the fluorescent glare of night light and every-day symbology. All these components are imbued with a bright red glow. The scene can be seen as a gateway, an exit, or even an escape to somewhere else.

Red Room

Acrylic on canvas

51 x 51cm

2017

Samir Hamaiel | Red Room | giclee print | 70 x 50cm | 2017

End of the Line

Giclee limited edition print on paper (320gsm)

70 x 50cm

2017

 
Sandra Cipriotti | High Tea, for Two | acrylic on canvas | 70 x 90cm | 2017

Sandra Cipriotti

New South Wales,  Australia

The work represents - Etiquette. The ladylike, homemaking objectified female identity represented by the Wedgewood cup of tea: and 'High Society' - Fashion. The desire for success materialistically and physically and the unobtainable strive for perfectionism represented by a Carla Zampatti model. Conforming to these social norms and quest for materialism has us become invisible. Through dissection and stripping away of these what is left is our infinite nature, our authentic selves. It is larger than any constraints imposed on us (labels and limitations of society) larger than the canvas.

High Tea, for Two

Acrylic on canvas

70 x 90cm

2017

 
Sheilla Njoto | Script | printed book, manual binding | 20 x 18.4 x 4cm | 2017

Script

Printed book, manual binding

20 x 18.4 x 4cm

2017

Sheilla Njoto | Script | printed book, manual binding | 20 x 18.4 x 4cm | 2017

Sheilla Njoto

Victoria,  Australia

When thinking about texts and words, one cannot escape the philosophy of identity; how language constructs culture and the history of a human being. A person’s language creates a mystery in the concept of someone’s identity by triggering differences in how a person perceives others and how others perceive us. I am astonished by the way a person can be multiple persons when they speak other languages. The perception towards their surroundings is shaped by the culture of which language they are speaking. I am interested in the mystery behind the culture formed by language; does culture shape language or does language shape culture? And that would relate further to this question: does culture shape identity or does identity shape culture? If we cannot 100% understand ourselves, would that mean one’s perception of us could be the rest of the percentage of ourselves that we did not understand? Would that make their perception as a part of our identity?

By language, one can be seen in thousands of different ways by others. Quoting French rappers, Big Flo & Oli, “Je
suis un peu de moi et beaucoup des autres comme j’y pense.” (meaning: I am a bit of myself and a lot of the others when I think about it).

This philosophy escorted me to the idea of creating a set of alphabets. Foreign, unfamiliar, and questionable. The idea of pouring daily thoughts in poetry and random writings in these alphabets is meant to raise questions from the audiences—whether or not they perceive the author differently; or to ask myself the same question—whether or not I perceive surroundings differently.

 

Shereen Mahmoud

Queensland,  Australia

My latest self-portraits investigate chronic pain, its influence on intrapersonal communication, and interpersonal behaviour. Through my self-portraits, I communicate the profound emotions that life generates in me, capturing truthful moments of pain, and vulnerability. I believe that communicating our pain is a crucial element to communicating our truth. In this body of work, I explore the interface between traditional, and digital media, integrating traditional painting, photography, and digital art into one whole. I start the process by painting on canvas, paint my body, then compose, and photograph the scene. Finally, I proceed with the digital painting and image manipulation process.

Intoxicated

Archival inkjet print

70 x 70cm

2017

Fragile

Archival inkjet print

70 x 70cm

2017

 
Silivia A Sellitto | She Stares alone across the water | mixed media on photorag | 42 x59.4cm | 2017

Silvia A Sellitto

Victoria,  Australia

The work, She stares alone across the water (2017), is from the series, "End of an Era" (2017), which employed the processes of both manual and digital collage, photography, Fine Art printing and mixed media, including the use of thread, oil paint, Photoshop, chalk pencils and pinholes.

It explores gesture, altered bodies and methods of disguise that border on the surreal, presenting sinister and somewhat folkloric aspects of human experience and my own Southern Italian lineage. The work brings complexity to readings of Motherhood and domestic experience, with themes of cyclical loss, grief and fear.

She stares alone across the water

Mixed media on hahnemuhle photorag

42 x 59.4cm

2017

Silvia A Sellitto | Prowling in the darkness | oil on linen | 70 x 57cm | 2017

My work in experimental portraiture explores gesture, altered bodies and methods of disguise that border on the surreal, presenting sinister and somewhat folkloric aspects of human experience.
 

This work forms part of my "Leave the Night Light On" series - emotionally charged tableaux drawing on painting, photography and collage, including the re-creation of artworks created by my children. My work brings complexity to readings of Motherhood and domestic experience, with themes of cyclical loss, grief and fear appearing alongside whimsical, painterly qualities. An alternate universe is represented where fears and anxieties are playfully explored, and make-believe collides with everyday life.

Prowling in the Darkness

Oil on linen

70 x 57cm

2017

 
Skye Tranter | The Dentist | oil on linen | 40.1 x 80.1cm | 2017

Skye Tranter

Queensland,  Australia

Coral trout lounging on the bottom of the coral sea, as a cleaner wrasse cleans out their teeth. I love North Queensland and I love the reef, and "The Dentist" displays just a fragment of the environment I love. The Dentist also signified that at the time I was cleaning out my life and moving on.

The Dentist

Oil on linen

40.1 x 80.1cm

2017​

 
Stephen Tiernan | Life of Service | oil on canvas | 34 x 36cm | 2017

Stephen Tiernan

Queensland,  Australia

In December 2017, Detective Inspector David ISHERWOOD retires from the Queensland Police Service after completing 42 years. An honourable ‘Life of Service’ to the people of Queensland.

Life of Service

Oil on canvas

34 x 36cm

2017​

Susannah Paterson

New South Wales,  Australia

Susannah Paterson | Wide Eyed | oil on canvas | 100 x100cm | 2016

Wide Eyed (2016)  is an oil painting on stretched canvas depicting an allegory of the artist's childhood. The colours of blues and pinks convey innocence and simplicity, but in between the teddy bears and toys are the darker images of bottles, boogie men and religion. The painting emerged from a meditative state in which the artist makes rhythmic, conscious and unconscious marks before deciding what to develop and what to leave. It's a complex and sometimes unnerving process requiring a lot of staying with uncertainty before something begins to form.

Wide Eyed (Back then a mixture of things happened)

Oil on canvas

100 x 100cm

2016​

 
Susannah Paterson | A Still Life | oil on canvas | 72 x 72cm | 2017

A Still Life is an imaginary still life describing inanimate objects, such as jug and teapot, along with figures reading, staring into space or meditating. The colours of cool viridian and yellows, combined with warmer tones create an image of stillness and calm. The artist paints from imagination, beginning each work in the same way of rhythmic "conscious/unconscious" marks. From there, a decision is made about what to develop. The images nearly always reflect the current emotional state of the artist.

A Still Life

Oil on canvas

72 x 72cm

2017​

Virginie Senbel-Lynch

Queensland,  Australia

 

Playing with Fire

Watercolour pencil on black paper

48 x 73cm

2017​

The Black Magic (2017) series is about how drawing technicity and light can lead to confusion between reality and illusion. Our expert eyes and brain will use the light and lines to determine what it is looking at and determine what it is from what is visible. Shrouded in symbolism, the series Black Magic is a reflection on the medium itself as the photorealistic drawings with a theme on magic and illusions will leave you wondering if you are really looking at a drawing or if you have been fooled and it is a photo.

Virginie Senbel-Lynch | Playing with Fire | watercolour pencil on black paper | 48 x 73cm | 2017
Virginie Senbel-Lynch | Into the Light | watercolour pencil on black paper | 73 x 48cm | 2017

Into the Light

Watercolour pencil on black paper

73 x 48cm

2017​

 
Wade Goring | After Hours | digital art print | 84.9 x 118.9cm | 2017

Wade Goring

New South Wales,  Australia

This digitally produced work speaks to the internal demons we all have trapped inside us. The dark alley at night is a classic symbol of fear and vulnerability that many can recognise. These places can also be where people escape to, away from sight, to be free to be themselves. Here, a male figure half dressed in business attire walks fashion model-like in the shadows of night. Free from his daytime prison, his real self-erupts forth, clawing for freedom, even from the bounds of the work itself.

After Hours

Digital art print

84.9 x 118.9cm

2017​

Wade Goring | Pop Demonic Fantasy | digital art print | 118.9 x 84.9cm | 2017

This digitally produced work is a fever dream of mixed emotions, desires, fears and contradictions. There is a deliberate satanic inference. Is desire, sexuality and fetish evil? If it is, why is it so alluring and addictive, like an intensely sugary treat you know you shouldn't have. Femininity in masculinity is also referenced. Is this evil too? Or is it empowering. Teddy bears are oddly analogous. They're cute, loveable, synthetic replicas of an animal that can easily rip you to shreds - but want them, love them - we do.

Pop Demonic Fantasy

Digital art print

118.9 x 84.9cm

2017​

 
Wayde Owen | Inner Landscape (resting place) | mixed media | 120 x 140cm | 2017

Wayde Owen

Queensland,  Australia

For me, painting is an argument between what it looks like and what it means – form vs content. While content is important, I will often set my paintings on fire or leave them outside for long periods of time. Nature can often help transform a painting in ways conventional paint cannot. Some works can take months or even years to resolve. It is through this cycle that I’m reminded of man's place in the cosmos.

Inner Landscape (resting place)

Charcoal, bitumen, clay, pine, taxidermy and paint on canvas

120 x 140cm

2017​

 
Wendy Goodwin | Girl by the River | mixed media - archival giclee print | 50 x 37.5cm | 2017

Wendy Goodwin

South Australia,  Australia

In this monochromatic study, I wanted to capture a quiet, pensive and soulful atmosphere. The mess of bare winter trees, the rambling foliage of the bank, and the rushing of the river is juxtaposed with the stillness and statuesque quality of the lone figure. This photograph exemplifies a very private moment, which is enhanced even more so by employing black and white - washing away any trace of colour that would distract from the stark imagery. Unlike many photographs entered into competitions, this scene was not contrived in any way, but rather serendipitously captured, resulting in a true sense of authenticity which can never be orchestrated. The river cuts diagonally through the image, dividing the tangled branches from the lush undergrowth in the foreground, thus drawing the eye to the figure who bridges this dichotomy, creating a beautiful scene. 

Girl  by the River

Mixed media - Archival giclee print 

50 x 37.5cm

2017​

Wendy Goodwin | Settlement | mixed media - archival giclee print | 90 x 40cm | 2017

Settlement

Mixed media -Archival giclee print 

90 x 40cm

2017​

My inspiration for this piece was the ever-expanding suburban development of our cities - encroaching on the natural world and bushland beyond. Using a bespoke technique which I have developed in my art practice, I have combined, blended and layered my photography to achieve a unique effect here. The gum trees themselves become hollowed out with structures, representing the seemingly uncontrolled building of new homes and the corresponding loss of habitat for our native animals. The addition of iconic Christmas trees and lights evokes the uneasy imposition of European culture, flora and fauna on our Australian landscape. 

 

Ken Goshen

New York, United States

Ken Goshen | Adaam the Photographer | oil on canvas | 101.6 x 76.2cm | 2016

This piece is part of a body of work in which I explore the relationships between figures, spaces, and the processing of visual data. I use the formal qualities of the work as a means for subtly expressing emotional and ethical standpoints. By drawing on the collective associative image bank of classical iconography, I wish to instil a sense of timelessness in depictions of the familiar, the fleeting, and the banal.

Adaam the photographer

Oil on canvas

101.6 x 76.2cm

2016

 

 

Youjia Lu

Victoria, Australia

Collide-Parallel Universe (2017) explores the possibilities to image a super(im)posed ‘Self’ whose states of actual and virtual; unitary and fragmentation exhibit possible coexistence in video art.

Referring to a concept of ‘superposition’ in quantum theory which allows two antagonistic states to coexist in a state of indeterminacy, I propose a super(
im)posed ‘Self’ whose regression toward the unformed antecedent to a self- image and the antagonistic state of attesting the boundary of her mirror- reflection coexist in a visual collision.

Collide-Parallel Universe consists of two types of visual collision: a horizontal collision happening between the different movements of ‘Self’ in the split-screen; and a vertical collision that occurs when the superimposed layer of a fragmented ‘Self’ is interfering it’s the unity. An indeterminate state of the ‘Self’ emerges in the progression of this visual collision.

Collide-Parallel Universe

Two-chanel video

Variable

2017​

 

Contemporary Art Awards

ABN: 55 760  918 301

 

Location:  Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

 

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