<script>

  (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){

  (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o),

  m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m)

  })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga');

 

  ga('create', 'UA-60457870-2', 'auto');

  ga('send', 'pageview');

 

</script>

<script>
  (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){
  (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o),
  m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m)
  })(window,document,'script','https://www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga');

  ga('create', 'UA-60457870-2', 'auto');
  ga('send', 'pageview');

</script>

Finalist Exhibition 2016

Award Winner

Kevin Song

Contemporary Art Awards 2016 Winner | Kevin Song | Winter Landscape | Acrylic on canvas | 76 x 61cm | 2015

Winter Landscape

Acrylic on canvas

W76 x H61cm

2015

Highly Commended

Highly Commended

Three Boxes

Animation

1920 x 1080 pixels

2016

Contemporary Art Awards 2015 Highly Commended | Vrinda Gleeson | Bath-Time | Oil, charcoal, & acrylic on board | 90 x 120cm | 2015

Bath-Time

Oil, charcoal, and, acrylic on board

90 x 120cm

2015

 

 

 
Aaron McGarry | Cernunnos | Photographic print on fine art paper | 98 x 78cm | 2016

Cernunnos
Archival photographic print on fine art paper

W98 x H78cm
2016
 

Aaron McGarry 

New South Wales, Australia

 

Masks in many ancient cultures were used to communicate to spirits for ceremonial or ritual purposes. My mask making process began as a way of summoning the spirit of nature. Based on 'Cernunnos', a Celtic god, also referred to as the Horned God and attested to being the deity of nature and fertility. The work is set in a dystopian future in which 'nature' had fort back and reclaimed its balance over us. The human form is no longer a 'being' as we now know it, but is akin to something more spiritual and powerful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Aleta  Lederwasch | Man in Mountain | Gouache and pencil on paper | 30 x 40cm | 2016

Man in the Mountain
Gouache and pencil on paper
W30 x H40cm
2016
 

Aleta Lederwasch

New South Wales, Australia

 

The purest form of ourselves is a truthful Being, dissolved of the boundaries of our bodies. We are part of the land and every aspect of the environment that surrounds us, we are all connected. Here lays a man in full consciousness of this concept of oneness. So much so that his body has begun morphing into the environment that surrounds him. His skin, the palette of the Australian bush, water and rock - dusty hues of pinks, blues, greens, coppers, and browns, and he is washed into a humble state of living peacefully with the land. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Alice Penco | Mmmmm π (Pi) | Spraypaint on plywood | 60 x 20cm | 2016

Alice Penco

New South Wales, Australia

Mmmmm π (Pi)​
Spray-paint stencils on plywood (26 hand-cut layers)

W60 x H20cm

2016
 

 
Ann Rayment | Lifeblood | Mixed media on canvas | 116 x 160cm | 2016

Ann Rayment

New South Wales, Australia

Lifeblood
Mixed media on  canvas

W116 x H160cm
2016

 
Anthony Makhlouf | Elijah | Watercolour, felt tip pen & photography | 2016

Antony Makhlouf 

New South Wales, Australia

My works are gentle violations of the gender binary. I soften established rules of gender portrayal into a fluid state of expression by transferring stereotypical traits of women onto my male subjects. The men are gentle, docile, and emotive. Their beards, a token of masculinity, are feminised as they are flowing, buoyant, and vibrantly coloured. This switch of gender portrayal onto the opposite sex does not speak for the entire gamut of gender identity but points at its existence.


I ascribe masculine and feminine attributes to my materials and then redefine gender through my administration of them. My line work are created by felt tip pens. These markings are 'masculine' due to their solid and direct nature. The fluidity and opacity of my watercolours can be understood as feminine as we are taught that female is soft, gentle, and flowing. By marrying these two materials in my work, I illustrate that male and female traits are not separate, they are fluid and blend into each other in varying intensities from person to person.


Art has the ability to infuse its subjects with worth thus validity and here lies my objective: to celebrate the deviants of conventional gender roles by making them into desirable works of art.

 

 

Elijah
Digital composite of watercolour, felt tip pen, and photography on paper

W60 x H80cm

2015
 

 
Carlos Jacinto | A New Adventure | Acrylic on canvas | 60 x 90cm | 2016

A New Adventure

Acrylic on canvas

W60 x H90cm

2016
 

Carlos Jacinto

Northern Territory, Australia

 

 

A New Adventure (2016) represents the creator and mother nature's animal spirits watching over the earth by opening a gateway between the spirit realm and our world. The title is a suggestion towards doing what is right while moving forward out of every bad situation. My work is intuitively constructed allowing whatever is inside to flow onto the canvas. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Cathy Yarwood-Mahy | Tangerine Sun | Acrylic on canvas | 76 x 76cm | 2016

Cathy Yarwood-Mahy

Victoria, Australia

 

 In this painting, I began with vibrant colour, applying the paint with large, free strokes. The vertical and horizontal brushwork became water. Distant trees are suggested with a few palette knife marks. Delicate clouds and water ripples were added. The sun came next, balancing the red lake. Lastly, the birds were included to give the painting interest and an oriental atmosphere. The areas of white canvas contrast with the unusual colour of the water and the looseness of the background offset the carefully painted birds. Finally, your eye is lead towards the dramatic, tangerine sun with its emotional overtones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tangerine Sun
Acrylic on canvas

W76 x H76cm

2016
 

 
Christine Scurr | Floating in Indigo | Acrylic, oil pastel & pencil | 2016

 

 

 

I am a painter of internal landscapes and my aim is to take myself and the viewer on a journey. Colour and abstraction are my paths to painting a response to my inner and outer worlds. The process involves authentic mark making and spontaneous application of paint, layering, and feeling the guidance of the energy contained on the surface. I embrace a mysterious and ethereal place of being, its comfort and healing are a driving force in my work.  Floating in Indigo (2016) is an intuitive work that dances between inscape and landscape, reflecting a curiosity to explore a sensory journey through my imagination and colour.​

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christine Scurr

Queensland, Australia

Floating in Indigo

Acrylic, oil pastel, and pencil on canvas

W101.5 x W101.50 cm

2016

 
Danny Kneebone | The Doyenne of Burlesque | Archival photographic print on fine art paper| 80 x 64cm | 2016

The Doyenne of Burlesque: Opening Night Anticipation

Archival photographic print on fine art paper

W80 x H64 cm

2016

 

 

Danny Kneebone | Temptation of the Spirit | Archival photographic print | 80 x 64cm | 2016

Temptation of the Spirit

Archival photographic print on fine art paper

W80 x H64 cm

2016

Danny Kneebone

Victoria, Australia

 This work and the three below are part of a dramatic photographic series that portrays renowned contemporary burlesque performers through narrative art. The artists depicted in this series of work are performers who actively contribute to the vaudeville scene in Australia. Therefore, the aim of the work is not only to shed light on the burlesque industry but to reveal the artists who continue to cultivate this genre in Australia.

 

The Doyenne of Burlesque: Opening Night Anticipation (2016) features the notable performing artist Dolores Daiquiri, a director and co-founder of the largest touring Burlesque Festival. The aim of this work is to showcase the Doyenne in her glory. 


The narrative moves from past to present, visually portraying the performers opening night transitions from back to centre stage. Her multi-layered costume exemplifies the layers of experience while the vivid colours symbolise her love for burlesque. Overall, the work illustrates a sense of wonder and intrigue bringing the viewer to a foreign midpoint between reality and illusion.

 

A leading actress and a mistress of ceremonies on the Australian Burlesque scene, Aurora Sheehan is highlighted in this photographic work. Temptation of the Spirit (2016) renders the artist in an unfolding scene revealing the burlesque performer in the midst of an act. The work also eloquently provides a representation of a theatrical parody played on stage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Dannyl Kneebone | Purple Feathers | Archival photographic print | 80 x 64cm | 2016

Purple Feathers (2016) is a portrait of a contemporary burlesque performer through narrative art. The artist depicted in this image is a performer who actively contributes to the vaudeville scene in Australia. Therefore, the aim of the work is not only to shed light on the burlesque industry but to reveal the artists who continue to cultivate this genre in Australia. Capturing a moment of evolving drama, creating a sense of wonder and intrigue, bringing the viewer to a foreign midpoint between reality and illusion and revealing the freedom of expression that is burlesque.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purple Feathers

Archival photographic print on fine art paper

W80 x H64cm

2016

Dannyl Kneebone | Dance to Another TIme, Another Place II | Archival photographic print | 80 x 65cm | 2016

Dance to Another Time, Another Place II

Archival photographic print on fine art paper

W80 x H65cm

2016

Burlesque acts, like other narratives, take the audience on a provocative journey. With this in mind, Dance to another Time, another Place II (2016) recreates the performer’s intention to transcend the audience’s reality to a mysterious place and time. This is done through the clever use of colour, lighting, and spiritual imagery in the background.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pathogenicity

Single-channel video

16:9 ratio - variable

2016

 

 

 

 

Donna Maree Robinson

Sound Design: Andrew Gibbs 

Queensland, Australia

 

Pathogenicity (2016) is an artistic exploration of the microbiological analysis of water quality. It explores the repetitious nature of lab analysis, its cylindrical equipment and the rich luminous nature of the reactive work.
 

Striving to visualise the invisible, the imagery combines fact with fiction to reflect elements of the microscopic, ranging from waterborne bacterium to its imaginative journey into human cells. It unveils a visceral spectacle or artificial aperture, that provides us with an aesthetic portal into human health concerns and the analysis of a globally fragile and finite resource.

Graziela Guardino | In Between | Acrylic on organza and felt on canvas | 100cm x 150cm | 2016

In Between
Acrylic, felt, and organza on canvas

W100 x H150cm
2016
 

 

Graziela Guardino 

New South Wales, Australia

 

 In Between (2016) explores material and physical experience as a way of communicating and understanding the world. The work represents shifts between present and past, stillness and motion, disappearance and resistance. With an interest in the fragility of life, I investigate the capabilities of mediums as the limits of what a painting can be.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Ian Kingsford-Smith | Lineage Man | Acrylic on fibreglass | 70 x 130 x 70cm | 2016

Ian Kingsford-Smith

New South Wales, Australia

 

We live in a culture where the perpetuation of family ancestral lineage and the family as a social institution are central. By producing children, we continue life's pageant. Through offspring, we cheat death. Yet something seems uncertain or incomplete with this idea of defining humanity based on instinctual behaviours. In today’s world, the idea of procreation can at times affront human dignity because it may affect the potential for individual differences and personal choice.​Questions posed by this work are: Are we aspiring for life after death or immortality through the perpetuation of the lineage? Does procreating provide the answer to life after death?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lineage Man

Acrylic on fibreglass

W70 x H130 x L70cm

2016

 
Jane James | Faggot #1 | Synthetic polymer on linen | 137 x 137cm | 2016

Faggot #1

Synthetic polymer on linen

W137 x H137cm
2016
 

Faggot #2 | Synthetic polymer on linen | 121.5 x 152cm | 2016

Faggot #2

Synthetic polymer on linen

W121.5 x H152cm
2016
 

 

 

 

 

Jane James

Queensland, Australia

 

Representing a burden easy to bear, a faggot was a standardised Medieval unit of measurement. These are life-sized representations of this unit. Each bundle is individual and possessed of a unique character. They are treated as portraits of a thing of beauty. Differentiated by their bindings, knots and timbers, they are unified by meaning and scale. Constrained within a box and a constructed plane, they spill from this visual plane, breaking the boundaries. These works seek to question the notions of meaning, intent, and language. They address the symbolism of the faggot, in both its historical and contemporary significations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Janet Angus | Silently You Fade Away | Oil on Board | 81 x 122 x 5cm | 2016

Janet Angus

ACT, Australia

My body of work is an investigation of the representation of psychological space, through constructed worlds suggestive of emotional states. I am interested in exploring narratives of the unconscious, and how this can be used to give visual form to an internal experience.


My recent oil on board paintings depict the forms of stark architecturally informed constructions that consist of layered two-dimensional surfaces. Silently You Fade Away (2016) is part of a series of paintings that explore the complexities of the subconscious, and its interrelation with experience and response.​

 

 

 

Jenni Eleutheriades | Memoria Obscura | Paperclay & crystaline glaze | 9 x 5 x 4cm | 2016
 

Silently You Fade Away

Oil on board

W81 x H122 x D5cm

2016

 

 

 

Memoria Obscura

Paperclay and crystalline glaze

3 x W9 x H5 x D4cm
2016
 

 

 

 

Jenni Eleutheriades 

New South Wales, Australia

I had my own cardboard chest hidden in my room. I would fill it with pretty rocks and gemstones and sit in my room with its contents spilled out all over my bed to marvel at how beautiful all my tiny treasures were. Therefore, my work is based around the subject of memories and nostalgia. I focus on personal experiences and responses one has with objects, striving to depict and recreate nostalgic memories I have from when I was a child. I create my work by mimicking a natural process. Through the use of different mediums, I am able to grow my own crystals on the surface of my hand built forms. The crystals are grown during an intricate firing cycle.

John Procter | Glenelg Jetty | Watercolour on cresent board | 69 x 59cm | 2016

Glenelg Jetty

Watercolour on crescent board
W69 x H59cm
2016

 

 

 

 

John Procter 

South Australia, Australia

 

My art is an expression of life, reflective, an emotional response to people and nature, a savoring of the moment, the lifting of life, the observation and the emotional tie between the subject and the heart. Illustrations, raw art created outside the boundaries of official culture to satisfy an inner need. The overwhelming desire to share the experience of a world, an outsider looking in, a journey, the visual image is primarily a vehicle of my storytelling impulse.

 

 

 

Joy McDonald | Poe | Mixed media on watercolour paper | 42 x 29cm | 2016

Poe

Mixed media on watercolour paper

W42 x H29cm
2016
 

 

 

 

 

Joy McDonald

Queensland, Australia

 

I love the addictive drama of drawing in charcoal. Through the process of layering and veiling charcoal, pastel, and gesso, my gestural marks may reveal an emotionally charged image, which offers me - and perhaps you - a seductive path in and into the darkness.

 

Kailum Graves | Data Rock | 6 Archival inkjet prints face mounted to acrylic | 121 x 40cm ea | 2016

Data Rock (Take Me Somewhere Nice)

6 Archival inkjet prints face mounted to 6mm acrylic

W121 x H40cm each

2016
 

 

 

 

 

 

Kailum Graves

Queensland, Australia

A series of abstract landscapes created by sequentially copying the colour of every pixel in six 100px by 100px images and pasting it successively to create entirely new images from the sampled pixels. Pixels interest me because they are the smallest controllable element of a picture. The aesthetics of copy and paste is, to me, the epitome of the transformative philosophy of sampling, and is the perfect response to the bombardment of media imagery. I believe that everyone should be able to create art, and thus meaning, out of the cultural materials of the everyday.

Karen Benjamin | Patchwork of Ideas and Solutions | Recycled heat fused plastic  | 20 x 75 | 2015

Patchwork of Ideas and Solutions

Recycled heat fused plastic packaging

W20 x H75.5cm

2015

 

 

 

Karen Benjamin

Queensland, Australia

Patchwork of Ideas and Solutions (2015) is a response to the use of plastic and the subsequent effects it has on our environment. Plastic is a modern day convenience but an ecological disaster with studies finding that 32% of all plastic packaging escapes collection systems and finds its' way into natural ecosystems including the ocean. By 2050, it is estimated that there will be more plastic than fish in the ocean unless drastic steps are taken to stop plastic entering our waterways. Therefore, the aim of the work is to encourage the audience to reconsider how we use plastic in our everyday lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karl de Waal | A Brief History of Colonialism | Mixed media | 20 x 30 x 18cm | 2015

Karl de Waal

Queensland, Australia

This sculpture tries to explain in a very rudimentary way the global history of colonialism and imperialism. By playing with stereotypes in a very naive manner the work attempts to simply and succinctly expose the very nature and reality of these histories.

Karl de Waal | A Brief History of Colonialism | Mixed media | 20 x 30 x 18cm | 2015

A Brief History of Colonialism

Found concrete, novelty plastic, lead figure, and resin

W20 x H30 x D18cm

2015

 
Kate Barry | Traversing | Giclée print on rag paper | 66 x 90cm | 100 x 76cm | 2016

Kate Barry

Queensland, Australia

 

 Traversing is about capturing the vitality and movement of gestural energy. Paint combined with harder edges of graphic shapes anchor and contrast the mercurial brushstroke pattern as emboldened marks traverse and gallop across the work. I am interested in the juxtaposition of intuitive painterly expression and graphic design forms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Traversing

Giclee ink print on archival cotton rag paper framed behind glass

W100 x H76cm 

2016
 

 
Kate Bender | Untitled  (IMMERSED twelve) | Oil on canvas | 84 x 71cm | 2016

Kate Bender

New South Wales, Australia

 

Kate Bender’s colourful abstract paintings are an immersive exploration of the internal spaces of the mind. The paintings are a sensorial experience that emanates a luminosity heightened by multi-directional light sources, radiating a charge of energy or a sense of tranquillity, while an overriding harmony arises from the colour relationships. The elements of both abstraction and illusionism create an uncertainty of the spaces and forms within, which invites further contemplation on the nature of ambiguity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled (Immersed Twelve)

Oil on canvas

W84 x H71cm

2016

 
Kelly Austin | Paused Composition No.4 | Wheel thrown stoneware | 50 x 25 x 20cm | 2016

 

 

My work combines opposing wheel thrown forms; the vessel and non-vessel, the familiar and non-familiar, and the practical and abstract to extend the perception of three-dimensional objects associated with practical use. This combination occurs in still life painting and my practice investigates what happens when it is brought into three dimensions. 

The objects are unified by their symmetry around a central axis, the basis of wheel thrown form. I use colour and the placement of objects to give a sense of harmony and balance. A range of ceramic materials is used to disrupt their cultural status.

Kelly Austin

ACT, Australia

Paused Composition No.4

Wheel thrown stoneware and glaze

W50 x H25 x D20cm

2016

 
Kelly Pinner | Our Lives are Patterns | Brushed aluminium | 50.5 x 76cm | 2016

Kelly Pinner

Tasmania, Australia

 

A study in pattern and life, this piece is sublimated to metal and hangs as a finished item without distraction and borders. The pattern displayed is large, asymmetrical and limitless. The subjects; a pea plant and timber fence, come together in this piece to illustrate the congruous growth in everyday repetition. The study highlights aging, conformity, and metamorphous while bringing together the dichotomy of mystery and intrigue. Hidden in plain sight is the beauty of pattern and repetition on a grand scale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Lives are Patterns

Brushed aluminium

W50.5 x x H76cm

2016

 
Kevin Song | Winter Landscape | Acrylic on canvas | 76 x 61cm | 2016

Kevin Song

New South Wales, Australia

 

This work reflects my interest in memory, perception, and reality. The aim of the work is to communicate the poetic in the everyday, showcasing the unfamiliar in the familiar. There is a limited colour palette and a careful use of negative space. The fact that it is dawn and covered in snow was a challenging aspect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter Landscape

Acrylic on canvas

W76 x H61cm

2015

 

Len Hurley

New South Wales, Australia

 

Three Boxes (2016) is an animation generated by computer using mathematics; all three boxes started with the same equation. The numbers were then changed to modify the outcome. Fine adjustments and colour sets were also applied to obtain the desired effect. As a result, the boxes can be endlessly explored. Interestingly, small changes in numbers and colours can cause different outcomes. 

 

 

Three Boxes

Animation

1920 x 1080 pixels

2016

 
Leonie Barton | Eight Sticks On Rock Shelf and Sand | Giclee | 62 x 63cm | 2016

Leonie Barton

New South Wales, Australia

 

Eight Sticks on Rock Shelf and Sand (2016) is an ephemeral work that plays on perspective. By using the rock shelf half a meter above the sand and alternating the stick colours accordingly, I was able to capture the image as a whole. This image is no# 438 in a series of works created using only what is found on the ground and in that moment, using no tools and no photoshop. Everything must connect to create the harmony and balance I seek. The materials, the background, the weather and even myself, must all be in alignment to achieve the outcome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eight Sticks on Rock Shelf and Sand

Giclee limited edition print

W62 x H63cm  

2016

 

 

Lisa Koutoulas | This is Max | oil on board  | 36 x 40cm | 2016
 

This is Max

Oil on board

W36 x H40cm

2016

 

Lisa Kotoulas

New South Wales, Australia

 

Expression and gesture remain the primary focus of my work. It is within these still moments of suspended time, an exploration of self and identity is possible. 

Engaging in moments where the masquerades of daily life are disrupted, I consider the canvas as a type of mirror. Convinced that answers can only emerge by looking outward, I attempt to seize instances where emotion is unlocked.

Distracted by the idea of time, I find myself consumed in a place where past meets present, present distorts past, and timelines are absent. My artwork continues to reflect a place where the real and imagined collide. A place where reality is indistinguishable from the fabricated. A place where consciousness, subconsciousness, and unconsciousness meet.

 

 

 

 

 
Mark Kleine | 5 minutes with Anne Boleyn | digital photography | 60 x 90cm | 2015

Mark Kleine

Queensland, Australia

As part of a series called 60 Minutes with Anne Boleyn, this photograph may express the vulnerabilities that punctuate our ideas of sincere and artificial identities. While the subject seems to enact the work's namesake in costume, their immediate expression and the contemporary nature of the other materials present may indicate a kind of realism that suggests sincerity. Furthermore, a staged portrait sitting may undermine such a claim in favour of an idealised existence while this in itself may indicate genuine intentions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Minutes with Anne Boleyn

Found objects, archivable digital print

W60 x H90cm

2015

 

 
Melissa  Baldock | Convict Brick Ring  | Sterling silver, convict brick | 2 x 2 x 2cm | 2016

Melissa Baldock

Tasmania, Australia

 

I created this ring with the intention of bringing back to life a convict brick resourced from the demolition of a dilapidated convict built out-house. The shape and form are important aspects of the narrative associated with this piece. I wanted to preserve a piece of history, open up a conversation about the past, while simultaneously showing respect to the original maker of the brick. The piece, a collaboration of the past craftsperson with myself. Tasmania’s convict history tells a story of crime, punishment, toil, endurance and survival in some of the severest, yet most beautiful environments in the world.

Convict Brick Ring

Sterling Silver, found convict brick, and resin

W2 x H2 x D1.2cm

2015

 
Michael Simms | The Selfie | oil on poylester | 71 x 37cm | 2016

The Selfie

Oil on polyester

W71 x H37cm

2016

 

Never before have we had the tools to publish our daily minutia so explicitly. We share a lot of ourselves via social media, but how much are 'selfies' used to hide what we’re truly experiencing? 

In depicting the peculiar and often disturbing nature of the 'selfie’, my work takes aim at the selectively curated life. Through painting on a polyester surface with artificial lighting, I intended to convey the superficial undertones of the 'selfie' culture – the crafted and masked identity. I invite viewers to consider why individuals share their selfies online and explore the disparity between the authentic and virtual self.

Michael Simms 

New South Wales, Australia

 
Ness Flett | Given a Pelting | charcoal, ink & gouache on paper | 100 x 180cm | 2015

Given a Pelting

Charcoal, ink, and gouache on paper 

H100 x W180cm

2015

Ness Flett

Victoria, Australia

 

With a background in classical dressage training, Flett's 'Quagga' series are both dynamic and anthropomorphic. Exquisitely detailed zebras inhabit white space, evoking the extremities of rage, stress, and exuberance. Extensive study of horses as both rider and artist gives Flett the ability to channel her emotion into the very musculature of her subjects, translating feelings into the contortion of a zebra's spine, or the weight distribution and positioning of hooves. Flett's understanding of animal psychology adds an additional layer for further anthropomorphism; wild zebras constantly fight, establishing systems of dominance and submission and engage in herd politics and game play.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celestial Perversion

Single-channel video and sound installation

Variable

2016

 

 

 

 

   There is a classical antiquity to the act of human sacrifice or ritual murder. However, acts of dedication and self-sacrifice endure in their symbolism. The residue of the prehistoric human sacrifice is clear in the offering of self-identity.


An absence of response from the deity is considered to be a pacification of the deity, however, the desire for contact and reciprocation prevails. Within this work, we draw on unrequited love as analogous to relationships with the divine. It is the willingness to accept suffering and the poetry of desire. 

   

Peter Cheng

Molly Biddle

Western Australia, Australia

Rhoda Kirk | The Sublime (After Newman) | oil on canvas | 109 x 168cm | 2015

The Sublime (After Newman)

Oil on canvas

W109 x H168cm

2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rhoda Kirk

Western Australia, Australia

 

In 1948 Barnett Newman, the American abstract expressionist published a short article in the magazine Tigers Eye arguing that the sublime could not be expressed clearly in figurative terms and that it could only be expressed through abstraction of form or through the presence of voids. He argued that the sublime was present in the here and now. This raised a key question in critical discourse, particularly relating to painting, regarding the presentation of that which was un-representable. This painting seeks to challenge Newman's argument by representing a contemporary, technological, sublime through the practice of figurative painting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Samir Hamaiel | Invert | acrylic on canvas | 61 x 61cm | 2016

Samir Hamaiel

Queensland, Australia

 

 

 A continuation of my fascination with the in-between spaces in the urban environment, this work, is set in an inner city busway, that carves out of its built form context. The strange colour palette represents an otherworldly in-between, representing both a familiar reality and somewhere strange - somewhere else. Motifs of signage and lighting appear but transformed. The backdrop of the rust burnt orange sky suggests both day and night - an inverted world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Invert

Acrylic on stretched canvas

W61 x H61cm

2016

 

 

 
Sanne Koelemij | Double My Mark | mixed media | 301 x 194cm | 2015

Sanne Koelemij

ACT, Australia

My work explores the relationships between colour, shape, and material, to construct ambiguity in the pictorial order of marks. Specifically, I am investigating how colour, in the form of a painterly mark, can be deconstructed by the diversity of textures within my ‘canvas’. The materials in my ‘canvases’ are present as representational objects but also forgotten, or forced to become an illusion, by the diversity of colour in the painted marks. The aim of my work is not to challenge the use of traditional painting materials but instead, formally create a tension between painted (illusionary) and constructed (representational) mark making.

Doubled My Mark

Mixed media

W301 x H194cm

 2015

 

 

 
Sarah Tracton | Arrested Silence | porcelain | 30 x 21cm | 2015

Arrested Silence

Porcelain

W30 x H21cm

2015

Sarah Tracton | Terrain | porcelain | 30 x 21cm | 2015

Terrain

Porcelain

W29 x H20 cm

2015

 

 

Sarah Tracton

New South Wales, Australia

 

My art practice explores the intersection between technology and the human body; the transition from silence towards sound with a cochlear implant. For me, art has been a vital form of catharsis in channelling my creativity in response to diminishing hearing.

I build architectural porcelain slabs by pouring wet slip onto plaster surfaces, sheets then peeled away revealing coloured patterns. Each piece is unique and creates vast variations in surface. Marbled chromatic landscape panorama coloured surfaces are the result. 

Cyber technology has enabled me a recent freedom. Working with vibrant pops of colour and the translucent light of porcelain encapsulates this feeling. 

 

Sarah Tracton | Arrested Silence | porcelain | 30 x 21cm | 2015
Sarah Tracton | Terrain | porcelain | 30 x 21cm | 2015
 
Silvia A Sellitto | 3.30pm. I Lost me in my Body | Collage on  paper | 42 x 59.4cm | 2016

Silvia A Sellitto

Victoria, Australia

 

 In my current self-portrait series titled, Back in 5 minutes (2016), I explore the interchanging roles and rituals of everyday life that I have thrown myself into - motherhood, artist, lover, wife and employer (amongst others). 3:30pm. I lost me in my body (2016), is a reminder of the interludes of daily life required to help us reconnect with our current, often depleted selves. Through a fractured self-image, I am contemplating what is happening to me, trying to feel human again and the idea that I can pin “me” to the wall, but I cannot pin 'myself' down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3:30pm. I lost me in my Body

Collage on arches paper 

W42 x H59.4cm

2016

Silvia A Sellitto | 10:15pm. Every Way I Move is the Wrong Way | 42 x 59.4cm | 2016

 

 In my current self-portrait series titled, Back in 5 minutes (2016), I explore the interchanging roles and rituals of everyday life that I have thrown myself into - motherhood, artist, lover, wife, and employer (amongst others). 10:15pm. Every way I move is the wrong way (2016), is a reminder of the interludes of daily life required to help us reconnect with our current, often depleted  selves. Through a back-to-front self-image, I am contemplating what is happening to me, trying to feel human again and the idea that I can pin 'me' to the wall, but I cannot pin 'myself' down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10:15pm. Every Way I Move is the Wrong Way

Collage on lana drawing paper 

W42 x H59.4cm

2016

 

 

 
Simone LINSSEN | Covet | Oil on canvas | 76 x 61cm | 2015

Covet

Oil on Canvas

W61 x H76 cm

2015

 

 

Simone Linssen

Queensland, Australia

 

 Covet  (2015) speaks of the consequences of desire for possessions and power, and the subsequent emotions of loneliness and loss of identity. Inspired by a trip to Rome, Obelisks that dot the city were taken from Egypt as the Romans acquired control of the empire. These trophies of conquest were later converted from pagan to Christian monuments by the addition of new markings. The Roman Empire eventually fell, despite the possessions and control. Coveting is not just a part of human history but of the human condition, proving to be just as prevalent in today's society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Sofie Grosjean | The Garden | Installation | 2016

The Garden

Rocks, sand, fabric stones, 3D glow in the dark print, and LED's

W2 x H3m

2016

 

 

 

 

Sofie Dieu

New South Wales, Australia

 

The Garden (2016) investigates the bonds existing between us and our environment, and how our natural surrounding can affect us in a positive, soothing manner. Inspired by Zen gardens and naturally phosphorescent plants and animals, The Garden (2016) is an interactive light installation that is conceived to be seen in a concealed space or by night. It switches on and off, following a slow pulse pattern. When the lights are on, they reflect on the white stones and create a captivating halo, leading the viewers to a contemplative and restful state. When the lights switch off, the phosphorescent dots appear first vividly before slowly fading away.

Sofie Grosjean | The Garden (Night view) | Installation | 2016
Stella Chen | The Arrival | Fine art archival print | 2015

Stella Chen

New South Wales, Australia

 

 The Arrival (2015) is a camera based-performance. It explores the psychological relationship between trauma and memory, and it is intended to embrace the vulnerability and fragility in human nature, and hold the space in the gap of memory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Arrival

Archival print on fine art paper

W84.3 x H59.4cm

2015

 

 
Tanya Marie Reeves | Emilie | acrylic on canvas | 122 x 92cm | 2016

Emilie

Acrylic on stretched canvas

W122 x H92cm

2016

 

 

 

 

 

Tanya Marie Reeves

New South Wales, Austrlia

 

 

With over 20 years experience, my work is predominantly through acrylic, striking a balance between abstract and realism, harnessing the boldness of acrylics and intensity of saturated colour. The work uses contrasting block colours and manipulate lines, integrating strong geometric patterns with sensual feminine forms, while also exhibiting a meticulous sense of order. 

Emilie is immersed in her creative being, giving herself over to art itself, leaving everything and everyone else behind. I see the music in her... 

“Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.” Pablo Picasso

Thomas Thorby-Lister | Muted Tones | Acrylic on Linen | 140 x 100cm | 2015

Muted Tones

Acrylic on Linen

W100 x H140cm

2015

 

 

Thomas Thorby-Lister (Skulk)

New South Wales, Australia

An element of performance and physicality distinguishes Thomas’s paintings, bold in both scale and expressive gestures. The act of making is apparent; Thomas’s paintings are filled with authentic energy and spontaneity, this intensive physical process is a direct result of his mural practice, yet he explores this with a refined approach to painting.

 

This painting is from a recent solo exhibition, part of a series painted in Berlin during a three-month residency at “Institut Fur Alles Mogliche’. Thomas's work combines a personal graphic vocabulary of figures, objects, and primitive shapes, with expressionistic mark-making and an abstract composition.

 

 

 

 
Travis Bell | I Appreciate | Watercolour on paper | 69 x 47.5cm | 2016

I Apprectiate 

Watercolour on paper

W69 x H47.5cm

2016

 

 

 

 
Veronica Andrus-Blaskievics | Interwoven | Glass, fabric, acrylic, fishing line | 100 x 31 x 10cm
Veronica Andrus-Blaskievics | Interwoven | Glass, fabric, acrylic, fishing line | 100 x 31 x 10cm

Interwoven

Glass, fabric, Acrylic, and fishing line

H100 x W31 x D10cm

2015

 

 

Travis Bell 

Tasmania, Australia

I Appeciate (2016) features 40 of my closest friends and family reincarnated as little orange monkeys. After the greatest year of my life, it was one way to show my appreciation for them. 

 

Veronica Andrus-Blaskievics

New South Wales, Australia

 

 

The fragility of experiencing the loss of a loved one can be very overwhelming and the strength can be only gained back through the grieving process. Glass as a material is fragile, however, the glass beads weaved into a structure becomes strong. Deconstructing my grandfather's shirts was part of exploring aspects of the grief I've experienced. But constructing objects with the shirt fragments - building on and around them with the beaded structures - makes them whole again. The absence and the loss are suggested, but the new and whole object expresses the new experience of becoming resolved with his memory.  The translation of my feelings provides the opportunity for engagement and self-growth.

 

Bath-Time

Oil, charcoal, and acrylic on board

W90 x H120cm

2015

 

 

Vrinda Gleeson | Bath-Time | Oil, charcoal, & acrylic on board | 90 x 120cm | 2015

Vrinda Gleeson

New South Wales, Australia

 

 The interaction between women as artists and women as models is a private space where the traditional roles of spectator and subject are continuously challenged. This work was an outcome of a project titled Pose and Otiose which explored this space. As both a woman and an artist I was interested in how figurative art could contribute to a diverse understanding of women’s sensuality in context to a western society in which women’s bodies remain an object of obsession, caught between sexual advertising tropes and superficial feminist critiques.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Wade Goring | It Wore Many Masks | Digital painting on canvas | 84.1 X 59.4cm | 2016

Wade Goring

New South Wales, Australia

 It Wore Many Masks (2016) is heavily influenced by street art and a comic book aesthetic. Thematically, the work was inspired by nightmares, both terrifying yet exhilarating. Masks both hide and protect what lays beneath.  Starting with pencil and paper, I then produced the final work through the use of various digital art-making programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It Wore Many Masks

Digital painting on canvas

W84.1 x H59.4cm

2016

 
Yasmin Nebenfuhr | Shearing the Rams Again | Archival Photogaphic Print | 60 x 42cm | 2015

Yasmin Nebenfuhr

Victoria, Australia

 Australia’s wool industry has been documented from the 19th century through the Heidelberg Impressionist artists who included subjects of workers, fields, and livestock. Their endeavour to describe a national identity and illustrate the ‘working men of the land’ has been an evocative point of reference in Australian painting. By appropriating both the imagery and the title (ref. Tom Roberts), Shearing the Rams Again aims to re-contextualize traditional depictions of Australian painting history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Shearing the Rams Again

Archival Photographic Print

H60 x W42cm

2015

Contemporary Art Awards

ABN: 55 760  918 301

 

Location:  Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

 

Email: admin@contemporaryartawards.com or contemporaryartawards@gmail.com

Phone: +61 407 739 871 

Supporting

Emerging 

Artists

2019

Show More

Opening Hours

Mon-Fri: 10:00am - 5:00pm

Saturday: By appointment only

Sunday & Public Holidays: Closed

Closed: 23 Dec - 15 January

(AEST)

© 2015-2019 by Contemporary Art Awards

  • Wix Facebook page
  • Wix Twitter page
  • Instagram Social Icon